Qualifying Your Fabricator: Identifying Winners (and Losers)


Reading time ( words)

This month, I am once again weighing in with tips on qualifying a fabricator. In previous columns, I mentioned three things everyone should expect from their fabricators:

  • Quick quote responses;
  • Outstanding quality; and
  • Consistent on-time delivery.

I would like to add that, based on today’s board complexities, a review should be done prior to quote to make sure no manufacturing issues occur. This is critical when it comes to things like minimum pre-preg interfaces on high-copper coil boards or jobs with unique reference planes for various impedance scenarios. A potential customer would much rather be told up front that a given design is not producible than to wait three days for a quote, only to have the part go on hold after release to manufacturing because a good review was not done prior to release.

Quote Me on This

So, let’s start with the quote process. Whether the part is a simple double-sided part or a complex multilayer with numerous needs, you really would like to see a quote response back in a few hours, not a few days. Additionally you want accurate quotes that have taken into consideration all aspects of the board, such as drill time based on hole quantity, additional time for AS-9102 or Class 3 6012, first article reports, and any additional time if outside services are needed.

A three-day quote should be just that, regardless of your location and any outsources you may require. It is never good when a three-day is quoted but due to outside services or time zones still results in delays. Make sure any questions you have are asked up front to avoid these delays. Also, make sure there is a contact available for expedites.

Read the full column here.


Editor's Note: This column originally appeared in the November 2013 issue of The PCB Design Magazine.

Share




Suggested Items

Polar Instruments: Simulating PCB Potentialities

12/08/2022 | Nolan Johnson, I-Connect007
Nolan Johnson checks in with Polar’s Martyn Gaudion on the evolving needs of global PCB manufacturing markets in a post-pandemic world, where generating accurate PCB specification documentation is essential to successfully navigating today's rampant supply chain constraints. Polar has positioned itself to meet these needs through agile software product developments that allow OEMs and fabricators to simulate material interactions and end-product specifications, including in-demand features like a comprehensive "structure view" that allows users to visualize all the transmission lines on a given a PCB. Though keeping pace with the demands of a rapidly growing industry has been challenging, Polar's commitment to innovation has kept its software suite ahead of the curve.

Electronics vs. Physics: Why Vias Don’t Get Hot

12/06/2022 | Douglas Brooks, Consultant, and Johannes Adam, ADAM Research
Most of are aware that when we pass an electrical current through a trace (conductor), the trace will heat up. This temperature increase is caused by the I2R power loss dissipated in the resistance of the trace. The resistance of a copper trace is mostly determined by its geometry (cross-sectional area), and there are lots of studies trying to look at the relationship between the current down a trace (of known size) and the resulting temperature of the trace. But the situation is much more complicated than this. There are physical properties that exist that result in helping to cool the trace. These properties are usually a combination of conduction of the heat away from the trace through the material, convection of the heat away from the trace through the air, and radiation of the heat away from the trace.

My Experience With Maxwell

11/23/2022 | Happy Holden, I-Connect007
I was first introduced to James Maxwell in 1967 as a college student. I had to decide whether I would take the Maxwell fields course or the switching and coding course. Being a chemical engineering major with a co-major in control theory, I had heard about the trials and tribulations of the infamous Maxwell fields course.



Copyright © 2022 I-Connect007 | IPC Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.